Kahlil Gibran on pain

kahlil gibran

Khalil Gibran (January 6, 1883 – April 10, 1931) was a Lebanese-American artist, poet, and writer.Born in the town of Bsharri in the north of modern-day Lebanon.He is chiefly known in the English-speaking world for his 1923 book The Prophet, an early example of inspirational fiction including a series of philosophical essays written in poetic English prose. The book sold well despite a cool critical reception, gaining popularity in the 1930s and again especially in the 1960s counterculture. Gibran is the third best-selling poet of all time, behind Shakespeare and Lao-Tzu.

The Prophet is a book of 26 prose poetry essays written in English by Kahlil Gibran. It was originally published in 1923. It is Gibran’s best known work. The Prophet has been translated into over forty different languages and has never been out of print. In this book a Prophet who is about to board a ship is stopped by a group of people, with whom he discusses topics such as life and the human condition.

This book has a way of speaking to people at different stages in their lives. It has a magical quality, the more you read it the more you come to understand the words and it’s not filled with any kind of dogma and is available to anyone.

Your pain is the breaking of the shell that encloses your understanding.

Even as the stone of the fruit must break,

that its heart may stand in the sun,

so must you know pain.

And could you keep your heart in wonder at the daily miracles of your life,

your pain would not seem less wondrous than your joy;

And you would accept the seasons of your heart,

even as you have always accepted the seasons that pass over your fields.

And you would watch with serenity through the winters of your grief.

Much of your pain is self-chosen.

It is the bitter potion by which the physician within you heals your sick self.

Therefore trust the physician, and drink his remedy in silence and tranquillity,

For his hand, though heavy and hard, is guided by the tender hand of the Unseen,

And the cup he brings, though it burn your lips,

has been fashioned of the clay which the Potter has moistened with His own sacred tears.”

Strange, the desire for certain pleasures is a part of my pain.

“Hearts united in pain and sorrow
will not be separated by joy and happiness.
Bonds that are woven in sadness
are stronger than the ties of joy and pleasure.
Love that is washed by tears
will remain eternally pure and faithful.”

Related Articles you may like :

Love Letters in the Sand Some Quotes of Kahlil Gibran

Kahlil Gibran on love

Kahlil Gibran on pain

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About the alchemist

Out beyond ideas of wrong doing and right doing, there is a field. I'll meet you there. When the soul lies down in that grass, the world is too full to talk about. Ideas, language, even the phrase each other doesn't make any sense. ~Rumi
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13 Responses to Kahlil Gibran on pain

  1. FullEmpty says:

    Thank you for stopping by my blog 🙂 And thanks for a truly interesting blog of your own. I look forward to reading your posts.

  2. neodecaussade says:

    Dear Antryump,
    I truly enjoy Khalil Gibran. My favorite Gibran prose comes from the Prophet called “On Friendship.” Thank you for reminding me of this. Keep up the good work.

    God bless,

  3. soulconalas says:

    One of my favorite books of all time.

  4. moraja9 says:

    My favorite poet. :=)

  5. s.p hagen says:

    One of my Favorite All time poets.. I’ve been reading ” A tear and a smile” for i guess 12 years now .. not sure if I’ll ever complete it. every time I open the book, I find something new inside, even though I’ve read it all before. Life’s like that. Thanks for taking the time to create this amazing blog, and Cheers to You and to All!

  6. leewriter says:

    I especially like the part , “Much of your pain is self-chosen. It is the bitter potion by which the physician within you heals your sick self. Therefore trust the physician, and drink his remedy in silence and tranquility, For his hand, though heavy and hard, is guided by the tender hand of the Unseen, And the cup he brings, though it burn your lips, has been fashioned of the clay which the Potter has moistened with His own sacred tears.”

    I posted on Facebook that it reminds me of my deceased wife Amy and I in the “prime” of our alcoholism. The problem was we consumed too much of the bitter potion (alcohol) and it killed her and nearly killed me. I learned about the evils of alcohol abuse up close and personal but my egocentric self still is able to trick me into believing I should drink. Thanks for sharing the poem. It’s very eloquent and thought-provoking.

  7. Pingback: Kahlil Gibran on love | antryump

  8. markbivvens says:

    Pain and sorrow are so often the same: “The deeper sorrow carves into your being, the more joy you can contain.” And as you say rather well “Love that is washed by tears
    will remain eternally pure and faithful.”

    I’ve really been on about these seeming dichotomies lately. I cannot help but observe that as I learn more and more to accept that the world and events transpiring around me simply as they are–with objectivity, without imposing upon them some subjective notion of “this is good” or “this is bad”, “I do not like this” and so on–I can reach that unshakable space of being at peace. Shedding the subjective, it is possible to, as Lao Tzu recommends, be as water, not as stone.

    “Much of your pain is self-chosen”. Pain is such a subjective notion–not to suggest that it is easy to choose objectivity in the event that say a crocodile is munching on my leg. Still, if only implicitly, we’re talking not about physical but emotional pain. If I can let go of my continued demand for life to be a certain way for me, I can then choose to change my view of what happens in that random life. What would otherwise be a painful and scaring emotional experience can then be seen as a lesson and with that view I can be grateful for the experience as it is an opportunity to grow.

  9. Pingback: kahlil Gibran on Children | antryump

  10. Pingback: Love Letters in the Sand Some Quotes of Kahlil Gibran | antryump

  11. Pingback: Moving Water by Rumi | antryump

  12. Pingback: Rumi Quotes | antryump

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